Headshot of Erica Frankenberg with long brown hair and multi-colored blouse.
Published on: Jan 10, 2022

Erica Frankenberg, professor of education (educational leadership) and demography at Penn State and director of the Center for Education and Civil Rights, was recently named to the 2022 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings list of top 200 U.S.-based university scholars who influence education policy and practice. Frankenberg has been on the list every year since 2015.

The rankings, published in Education Week, list the university-based scholars in the United States who are identified as doing the most to shape educational practice and policy.

Frankenberg, who is also an SSRI's Population Research Institute associate, is frequently featured in the media for her research on racial desegregation and inequality in K-12 schools, the connections between school segregation and other metropolitan policies, the extent of school segregation today, and the connection between school and housing segregation.

Her work informs stories published by national news outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, PBS News Hour, LA Times, Associated Press, PolitiFact and 1A, among others. She also has been a guest on talk radio programs to talk about school segregation and why it matters.

Additionally, a book Frankenberg co-edited, “The Resegregation of Suburban Schools”, was named influential in a recent year-end column in “The New York Times”.

According to the RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings website, there are over 20,000 university-based faculty who work in K-12 education in the U.S. The rankings, published in Education Week, list the university-based scholars in the United States who are identified as doing the most to shape educational practice and policy. Information about the scoring process can be found on the Education Week website.

“I’m very honored to be recognized in the top 200 once again this year,” said Frankenberg. “It is my goal to make sure educational research findings are accessible and can be communicated to different audiences, especially those who help shape policies to be more equitable.”

For more information about Frankenberg's work, visit the Center for Education and Civil Rights website